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Hidden connection between the polar regions of the Earth revealed



Scientists have discovered a "climate connection" between the Atlantic Ocean and Antarctica.

An international team of scientists says that there are two forms of communication that are used to prevent major events related to climate change, and they say that the “SOS” message has already been sent due to current conditions.

It is said that there is a fast atmospheric channel and a much slower ocean.

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An international team of scientists discovered that there are two forms of communication that are used to prevent major events related to climate change, using atmospheric conditions and ocean currents. To restore the climate, the researchers investigated the ice cores (in the photo) from five different places in Antarctica and synchronized dates by looking at layers of volcanic ash.

An international team of scientists discovered that there are two forms of communication that are used to prevent major events related to climate change, using atmospheric conditions and ocean currents. To restore the climate, the researchers investigated the ice cores (in the photo) from five different places in Antarctica and synchronized dates by looking at layers of volcanic ash.

An international team of scientists discovered that there are two forms of communication that are used to prevent major events related to climate change, using atmospheric conditions and ocean currents. To restore the climate, the researchers investigated the ice cores (in the photo) from five different places in Antarctica and synchronized dates by looking at layers of volcanic ash.

“The North Atlantic sends messages to Antarctica at two different time scales,” said Kristo Buiser, a specialist on climate change at the University of Oregon and lead author of the study.

“Atmospheric communication is like a text message that comes immediately, and oceanic is more like a postcard that has not rushed there — in this case 200 years, which makes the postal service very good compared.”

In a study published in Nature, extremely abrupt events related to climate change were found 60,000–12,000 years ago, due to the repeated intensification and weakening of the ocean current that warms Greenland and Europe, bringing warm water from the tropics through the Gulfstream to the North Atlantic Ocean ,

This current is known as the Atlantic Meridional Inverted Circulation (AMOC).

New research papers show how the North Atlantic transmits these extreme events to Antarctica, on the opposite side of the world.

AS A REGISTERED POLAR REGION OF THE EARTH

The researchers found that the polar regions interact in two ways.

Researchers say that the first, atmospheric connection, is like a text message.

The second, oceanic, looks more like a postcard that is not in a hurry to get there.

Researchers have discovered “extremely harsh” climate change events 60,000–12,000 years ago – a re-strengthening and weakening of the ocean current that warms Greenland and Europe, bringing warm water from the tropics through the Gulf Stream to the North Atlantic.

This current is known as the Atlantic Meridional Inverted Circulation (AMOC).

“When the North Atlantic warms up due to the intensified AIOC, the whole of Antarctica will eventually cool due to oceanic changes,” said Buiser.

"It starts with the winds, but the ocean has a far greater impact in two centuries."

During the last ice age, this current AMOC, as a rule, was very weak, plunging the North Atlantic region into cold conditions.

But from time to time it would intensify very quickly, with the result that Greenland warmed up suddenly, the researchers say.

Whenever Greenland warmed, the climate in Antarctica on the other side of the world would change – twice.

Global atmospheric conditions immediately changed, and westerly winds blow around Antarctica, offset from the ground, causing warming in some parts of Antarctica and cooling in others.

The second half of the impact was much slower, the cooling effect of the oceans of the southern hemisphere, which did not manifest itself in Antarctica for 200 years.

To restore climate, researchers investigated ice cores from five different locations in Antarctica and synchronized dates by looking at layers of volcanic ash. They measured temperature changes by analyzing the ratios of water isotopes. They then compared the data with the well-established dates of the so-called “Dansgard-Eshger” events in the ice cores of Greenland to determine the connection between the hemispheres. Researchers say that these extremely harsh events occurred about 25 times during the last glacial period, from 100,000 to 20,000 years ago.

To restore climate, researchers investigated ice cores from five different locations in Antarctica and synchronized dates by looking at layers of volcanic ash. They measured temperature changes by analyzing the ratios of water isotopes. They then compared the data with the well-established dates of the so-called “Dansgard-Eshger” events in the ice cores of Greenland to determine the connection between the hemispheres. Researchers say that these extremely harsh events occurred about 25 times during the last glacial period, from 100,000 to 20,000 years ago.

To restore climate, researchers investigated ice cores from five different locations in Antarctica and synchronized dates by looking at layers of volcanic ash. They measured temperature changes by analyzing the ratios of water isotopes. They then compared the data with the well-established dates of the so-called “Dansgard-Eshger” events in the ice cores of Greenland to determine the connection between the hemispheres. Researchers say that these extremely harsh events occurred about 25 times during the last glacial period, from 100,000 to 20,000 years ago.

Observational data and climate models show that the current of AMOC is weakened today due to global climate change, so what happened during the last ice age can recur.

Researchers say that if the past is a guide for the future, then weakening the AIOC is likely to reduce the potency of the Asian monsoons, and billions of people will depend on this rain for their livelihood.

Changing the structure of wind in the southern hemisphere will also reduce the ability of the ocean to absorb carbon dioxide, which means that CO2 emissions will remain in the atmosphere, increasing the greenhouse effect.

“The findings may also have implications for the future,” said Buiser.

“AMOC is now weakening due to global warming and melt water from Greenland.

“A text message is sent and atmospheric conditions change. "Postcard" is on the way.

Researchers warn that other influences besides AMOC will also affect climate change — rising temperatures from greenhouse gases are a major factor worldwide, and changes in the ozone layer affect wind patterns and the climate in Antarctica.

Buzirt, who repeatedly participated in scientific expeditions to Antarctica and Greenland, said that the studies “are very interesting for those who invent, what about how the pieces of our climate are connected.


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