Tuesday , January 19 2021

SpaceX Space Internet Idea Gaining Momentum



According to data published by the service, the satellites should rise from mid-2019, and the entire network should be completed within nine years, and by the end of 2027. Satellites will fly around the Earth at 335-346 km with a high orbit, slightly lower than the International Space Station. They should be faster Internet connections than optical cables used, because electromagnetic signals in cables are about a third slower than in air or in vacuum. The signal transmitted by the satellites will take a little longer, but will take less time.

In addition, the satellite Internet will separate the fast connection from the physical connection points, so the connection will work in remote areas, at sea and even in the same space. So far, SpaceX has not published accurate information about the orbits of its satellites, but it is expected that many of them can concentrate between 47 and 52 degrees in both hemispheres – most of these large online shopping centers are located in these latitudes with a transmission speed of particular importance.

Another important aspect of this news is the number of satellites. So far, only about 8,000 satellites have been launched by people, of whom about a third or half are still working. If SpaceX fulfills its plans, the number of satellites in the earth's environment will increase by half an hour. With such satellites a big problem arises – their failures.

The small satellites planned by SpaceX usually only work for about five years, so it may be necessary for a company to update its satellites every five years. This will cause not only financial problems, but also the spread of space debris. Perhaps the Internet space will contribute to the progress of space junk or satellite service and longevity.

By the way, SpaceX is not the only company planning on the Internet with which many others are fighting for it, from telecommunications companies Samsung and Telesat to Facebook, Google and the giant Boeing.


Source link