Sunday , January 17 2021

Lack of global funds that can kill millions of people from malaria: WHO



In 2017, the world did not have $ 1.3 billion. US for malaria screening, and at least 400,000 people are likely to die in 2018 unless sufficient funds are allocated

In 2017, approximately 70% of all cases and deaths from malaria were concentrated in 11 countries: 10 in Africa and India. Credit: Getty Images
In 2017, approximately 70% of all cases and deaths from malaria were concentrated in 11 countries: 10 in Africa and India. Credit: Getty Images

The world has made significant progress in slowing the growth of malaria cases in recent decades, but progress will be stalled if the world does not raise enough funds. Malaria is a preventable disease, and another 0.4 million of them are likely to die this year from disease carriers.

Globally, it is necessary to prevent the incidence and mortality from malaria by at least 40 percent by 2020 and eliminate the disease in at least 10 countries. To achieve this, the world needed approximately 4.4 billion dollars. US in 2017 and by 2020 it will need $ 6.6 billion. USA. However, the new report of the World Health Organization states that in 2017, global funding for the fight against malaria and its elimination is not justified by the US $ 1.3 billion. USA (see table below).

Source: WHO

This is when total malaria funding increased by 7 percent between 2016 and 2017. Moreover, this gap between the general financing of malaria and the resource requirements indicated in the Global Technical Strategy for Malaria (2016-30) increased by almost $ 0.3 billion. US compared to the deficit calculated for 2016.

Funding is important, especially in high impact countries. In addition to India, 15 countries in Africa make up 80 percent of the global burden of malaria, according to World Malaria Report 2018. Although in 2017 there were fewer malaria cases worldwide than in 2016, there were 3.5 million more cases in 2017 compared to the previous year among the 10 countries with the highest burden in Africa in 2007.

In 2017, the bulk of the global fund came from international funding in the amount of $ 2.2 billion. US or 72 percent of the total. Small endemic countries contributed almost 28 percent.


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