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Fallout 76 cheaters have a fun way to avoid the ban.



All controversy around Fallout 76 getting weirder and weirder. At first it was nylon bags, then it was a boring support ticket, and now the topic turns to an essay. As it turned out, at least a few Fallout 76 The players were banned, and in order to shoot them, Bethesda asks them to write an essay about the evils of cheating in video games.

News of these bans first began to spread shortly before Christmas, when YouTuber JuiceHead published a video highlighting this strange appeals process. To hear Bethesda’s rationale for these bans, players at the center of it all were banned for fraud. Users claim they are not cheating and instead used only mods for Fallout 76 or change tools.

At the moment, it is unclear whether these players are really cheating or Bethesda prohibits users who are guilty only of running mods (Fallout 76 does not yet have official support for mods), but regardless of what actually happens, Bethesda’s requirements for lifting the ban are quite ridiculous. Apparently, Bethesda asked banned users to write an essay on the topic “why the use of third-party cheat programs is detrimental to the online gaming community” as part of the appeal process.

No, this is not a joke, at least according to GStaff on the ResetEra forums, which is called the Bethesda community leader. GStaff confirmed that the requests for the essay did take place, although the company would not require advancement. They also note that if players get a ban on using mods, they should contact Bethesda via the company's support site, so it looks like it is not intended to use mods to cause bans.

Even assuming that these banned players are guilty of fraud, Bethesda requires an essay before he considers lifting the ban, of course, is a unique approach. This is another thing that makes this whole Fallout 76 the rout is even more confusing. Let's see how it all shakes, so stay tuned.


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