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Stanford scientists use virtual reality to help save the real world




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Simulation of experimental activity in real time (VR) in Stanford OceanVirtual laboratory of human interaction at Stanford

Climate language, such as the “2C threshold” and “ocean acidification,” barely mixes emotions. But the consequences of these phenomena can easily overwhelm them: a hundred million people who planned to lose their lives in the next 11 years due to climate change. Approximately 75% of all people may die due deadly heat waves by the year 2100, Stanford researchers nullified virtual reality (VR) as a powerful tool to make abstract climate threats more visceral and personal before the effects of climate change become life-threatening visceral and personal. Today in the magazine Boundaries in psychology show show VR is a technological blow in the center of empathy that forces us to act before it is too late.

Study

The researchers used consumer-grade VR hardware and Stanford Ocean VF simulation (SOAE) in four different experiments. It was attended by 270 high school students, graduate students and graduate students and adult participants at the 2016 Tribeca Film Festival.

SOAE reflects the effects of climate change on our marine ecosystems. Modeling is available to the public for freeYou can choose between being an avatar of a diver or being part of a pink coral living your best life on an underwater reef. That is, until you and all your colorful underwater friends begin to die en masse. Simulation time misses the underwater holocaust to an impressive interval. In one version, the narrator will tell you:

Look at your right palm. Notice how the acidity eats away the shell of the sea snail. Take a moment to stroll and search for marine snails in this area. Could not find? This is because there are no living sea snails. They cannot survive in this environment. Ocean acidification will have a strong effect on all types of husk, including oysters, clams, corals and some species of plankton. Without these species, the entire food web may collapse. ”

Watch clips from research and SOAE:

Results, achievements

Participants estimate ocean acidification scores after the simulation has increased by more than 100%. Acid acidification information was confirmed, and the retention was more than three weeks later. The more time participants spent participating in the simulation, the more information they saved. & Nbsp;

A postdoctoral researcher Geraldine Fauville says that the team is working on the “act now” element in modeling, studying “concrete actions that people can think and implement in their daily lives.” In marketing science, this is the most important step in the sale of your message. Climate scientists and VR engineers could potentially benefit from the Don Draper marketing science set to convince humanity to press the Act Now! Button. & Nbsp;

Unexpected discovery

“In the history of VR, we talked a lot about how to use it for education,” said Jeremy Bylenson, a cognitive psychologist, founder and founder of the Laboratory of Virtual Human Interaction at Stanford University and co-author of the article. He says the study demonstrates that “you can successfully install VR into the curriculum. People enjoy it. They are studying. There are no negative consequences. ” This discovery was expected. What was interesting and unexpected is why VR seems to increase knowledge and empathy. "In two of the four studies in this article, we can predict how much people care about the environment and how much they want to know more about the environment, based on how much they move their body in a simulation." In VR studies, this is referred to as “embodied cognition,” and Bailenson believes that this is the mechanism that makes the message resonate. “Moving your body is the secret sauce here and what makes VR special,” says Bulenson, while noting that the data is correlated, not necessarily causal.

From the Stanford article: “The participants who explored more of the virtual space formed deeper cognitive associations with scientific content.”

Today’s study comes on the heels of an unrelated article published last month by the Nobel laureate and his team at the Max-Planck Institute in Germany that thinking uses the brain's navigation system, and that knowledge is organized spatially.

Influence

Participants reported a widespread positive VR experience. “It's pretty cool, very responsive,” says 18-year-old Cameron Chapman. "I definitely felt that I was under water."

“It was more realistic than I expected,” says senior high school student Alex Lewison. “I am a visual student. Watching ocean acidification happens differently than just hearing about it. ”

Similar enthusiasm was noticed at the Tribeca Film Festival:

Jane Rosenthal runs this event, where this is the wing of the VR festival, and there are dozens of booths where you can go in and make VR, "says & nbsp;Bailenson. "The festival lasts about a week. It is open from late morning until evening. We had a line of adults, which sometimes amounted to 100 people. They wait an hour, and sometimes two hours, to learn about chemistry.

The team demonstrated SOAE for Senator Sheldon Whitehouse Rhode Island, Congressman Suzanne Bonamiem of Oregon and former Senator Blanche Lincoln from Arkansas. “This simulation shows in rich detail the damage to carbon pollution on our oceans,” said Whitehouse after an event at Capitol Hill, organized by the non-profit environmental protection group Ocean Conservancy. "I appreciate the experience of the Stanford Ocean Acidification to draw attention to the dangers of our ocean and what we need to do to protect them."

VR does not change a strong commitment to climate negation:

“I was fortunate enough to invite an American congressman to the laboratory and actually make an experience in studying the ocean,” says Baylenson, “the congressman is the voice change of the day. “He served in our military in an amazing way. He came to the lab and was very respectful. He made two dozen demos where he really made them. He did not just go on these requests. ” The congressman was to cooperate and engage, but when Bailenson asked for feedback on the climate education of VR, the answer he received was just as depressing as a corrupt sea snail:

Let me get it right, – thinks Bylenson. “I will rephrase. I did not write it down, so I do not have a direct quote. A general idea of ​​what he said, you think that you represent science to me. I see that you represent what we call democratic scienceIt is the capital of D at the democratic level. Meaning, you choose a special kind of science that will resonate with Democrats, but this is not universal. I have not heard this before. I have heard it since then, because I obviously looked. It was just as unpleasant that I had some time at work. The Stanford Ocean Acidification experience has been intensively tested by a number of scientists, our brilliant colleagues, [marine scientists] Christie Kroeker and Fio Micheli. All of this is based on their work, where every detail, starting with how many centimeters this snail is now from this type of coral, all these details, ”Baylenson stutters. “We spend a lot of time and effort and just understand that polarization is high enough for marine science to be discounted as democratic, it was not a high point.”

Congressman advised Bailenson what he could do differently to convince people of climate change and its consequences.

He was careful not to go into the scientific details of climate change models in particular. Because I don’t think it would play on things he was comfortable talking about. He talked about the issue with climate change policy discussions, so that he always influences its participants. In his area, fracking is very large and natural gas is very large. He convinced me that I should try to make VR messages on environmental protection in order to clearly show how this does not contradict economic objectives. ”

Another suggestion was what Bailenson had previously heard, the framing of the conversation in terms of how climate change affects changes in migration patterns and how it affects things like the hunting season. “In general, it was a conversation in which a guy who had a wonderful track record, served our country, was a very prominent legislator, who really gave him a try, after all, he just fired what we built as a democratic science” .

Using VR, Bailenson succeeded in teaching Palau island nation officials about the negative environmental impacts. You can read about his work, which influences legislators in the direction of preservation in an article written by Beylenson National Geography.

Learn more about VR experiments, education and environmental protection at Bailenson & # 39; s Virtual laboratory of interaction with people at Stanford University.

* Funding for this study was provided by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.

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Simulation of experimental activity in real time (VR) in Stanford OceanVirtual laboratory of human interaction at Stanford

Climate language, such as the “2C threshold” and “ocean acidification,” barely mixes emotions. But the consequences of these phenomena can easily overwhelm them: a hundred million people who planned to lose their lives in the next 11 years due to climate change. Approximately 75% of all people may die due deadly heat waves by the year 2100, Stanford researchers nullified virtual reality (VR) as a powerful tool to make abstract climate threats more visceral and personal before the effects of climate change become life-threatening visceral and personal. Today in the magazine Boundaries in psychology show show VR is a technological blow in the center of empathy that forces us to act before it is too late.

Study

The researchers used consumer-grade VR hardware and Stanford Ocean VF simulation (SOAE) in four different experiments. It was attended by 270 high school students, graduate students and graduate students and adult participants at the 2016 Tribeca Film Festival.

SOAE reflects the effects of climate change on our marine ecosystems. Modeling is available to the public for freeYou can choose between being an avatar of a diver or being part of a pink coral living your best life on an underwater reef. That is, until you and all your colorful underwater friends begin to die en masse. Simulation time misses the underwater holocaust to an impressive interval. In one version, the narrator will tell you:

Look at your right palm. Notice how the acidity eats away the shell of the sea snail. Take a moment to stroll and search for marine snails in this area. Could not find? This is because there are no living sea snails. They cannot survive in this environment. Ocean acidification will have a strong effect on all types of husk, including oysters, clams, corals and some species of plankton. Without these species, the entire food web may collapse. ”

Watch clips from research and SOAE:

Results, achievements

Participants estimate ocean acidification scores after the simulation has increased by more than 100%. Acid acidification information was confirmed, and the retention was more than three weeks later. The more time participants spent on participating in the simulation, the more information they saved.

A postdoctoral researcher Geraldine Fauville says that the team is working on the “act now” element in modeling, exploring “concrete actions that people can think and implement in their daily lives.” In marketing science, this is the most important step in the sale of your message. Climate scientists and VR engineers could potentially benefit from the Don Draper marketing science set to convince humanity to press the Act Now! Button.

Unexpected discovery

“In the history of VR, we talked a lot about how to use it for education,” said Jeremy Bylenson, a cognitive psychologist, founder and founder of the Laboratory of Virtual Human Interaction at Stanford University and co-author of the article. He says the study demonstrates that “you can successfully install VR into the curriculum. People enjoy it. They are studying. There are no negative consequences. ” This discovery was expected. What was interesting and unexpected is why VR seems to increase knowledge and empathy. "In two of the four studies in this article, we can predict how much people care about the environment and how much they want to know more about the environment, based on how much they move their body in a simulation." In VR studies, this is referred to as “embodied cognition,” and Bailenson believes that this is the mechanism that makes the message resonate. “Moving your body is the secret sauce here and what makes VR special,” says Bulenson, while noting that the data is correlated, not necessarily causal.

From the Stanford article: “The participants who explored more of the virtual space formed deeper cognitive associations with scientific content.”

Today’s study comes on the heels of an unrelated article published last month by the Nobel laureate and his team at the Max-Planck Institute in Germany that thinking uses the brain's navigation system, and that knowledge is organized spatially.

Influence

Participants reported a widespread positive VR experience. “It's pretty cool, very responsive,” says 18-year-old Cameron Chapman. "I definitely felt that I was under water."

“It was more realistic than I expected,” says senior high school student Alex Lewison. “I am a visual student. Watching ocean acidification happens differently than just hearing about it. ”

Similar enthusiasm was noticed at the Tribeca Film Festival:

Jane Rosenthal holds this event, where this is the wing of the VR festival, and there are dozens of stands where you can go in and make VR, ”says Bailenson. "The festival lasts about a week. It is open from late morning until evening. We had a line of adults, which sometimes amounted to 100 people. They wait an hour, and sometimes two hours, to learn about chemistry.

The team demonstrated SOAE for Senator Sheldon Whitehouse Rhode Island, Congressman Suzanne Bonamiem of Oregon and former Senator Blanche Lincoln from Arkansas. “This simulation shows in rich detail the damage to carbon pollution on our oceans,” said Whitehouse after an event at Capitol Hill, organized by the non-profit environmental protection group Ocean Conservancy. "I appreciate the experience of the Stanford Ocean Acidification to draw attention to the dangers of our ocean and what we need to do to protect them."

VR does not change a strong commitment to climate negation:

“I was fortunate enough to invite an American congressman to the laboratory and actually make an experience in studying the ocean,” says Baylenson, “the congressman is the voice change of the day. “He served in our military in an amazing way. He came to the lab and was very respectful. He made two dozen demos where he really made them. He did not just go on these requests. ” The congressman was to cooperate and engage, but when Bailenson asked for feedback on the climate education of VR, the answer he received was just as depressing as a corrupt sea snail:

Let me get it right, – thinks Bylenson. “I will rephrase. I did not write it down, so I do not have a direct quote. A general idea of ​​what he said, you think that you represent science to me. I see that you represent what we call democratic scienceIt is the capital of D at the democratic level. Meaning, you choose a special kind of science that will resonate with Democrats, but this is not universal. I have not heard this before. I have heard it since then, because I obviously looked. It was just as unpleasant that I had some time at work. The Stanford Ocean Acidification experience has been intensively tested by a number of scientists, our brilliant colleagues, [marine scientists] Christie Kroeker and Fio Micheli. All of this is based on their work, where every detail, starting with how many centimeters this snail is now from this type of coral, all these details, ”Baylenson stutters. “We spend a lot of time and effort and just understand that polarization is high enough for marine science to be discounted as democratic, it was not a high point.”

Congressman advised Bailenson what he could do differently to convince people of climate change and its consequences.

Он был осторожен в том, чтобы не вдаваться в научные детали моделей изменения климата в частности. Потому что я не думаю, что это играло бы на вещи, о которых ему было удобно говорить. Он говорил о проблеме с обсуждениями политики в области изменения климата, так это то, что он всегда влияет на его участников. В его районе, fracking очень большой и природный газ очень большой. Он убеждал меня, что я должен попытаться сделать сообщения VR по охране окружающей среды, чтобы четко показать, как это не противоречит экономическим целям ».

Другое предложение было тем, о чем ранее слышал Байленсон, – обрамление беседы с точки зрения того, как изменение климата влияет на изменения миграционных моделей и как это влияет на такие вещи, как сезон охоты. «В целом это был разговор, в котором парень, у которого был замечательный послужной список, служивший нашей стране, который был очень выдающимся законодателем, который действительно дал ему попробовать, в конце концов, он просто уволил то, что мы построили как демократическая наука».

Используя VR, Байленсон преуспел в обучении чиновников островной нации Палау о негативных воздействиях на окружающую среду. Вы можете прочитать о его работе, влияющей на законодателей в сторону сохранения в статье, написанной Бейленсоном Национальная география.

Узнайте больше о экспериментах VR, образовании и охране окружающей среды в Bailenson&#39;s Виртуальная лаборатория взаимодействия с людьми в Стэнфордском университете.

* Финансирование этого исследования было предоставлено Фондом Гордона и Бетти Мура.


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